The Business Case for Big, Bold Conversations

The Business Case for Big, Bold Conversations

Given the current polarizing climate, people across the country are engaging in conversations and debates that historically have been “off limits” for the workplace. But is there a benefit to companies, if these conversations are happening already, to not only removing that label but also encouraging and providing a safe place for these talks to take place?

There is, says Mary-Frances Winters, founder and CEO of the Winters Group, Inc., and author of “We Can’t Talk About That at Work! How to Talk About Race, Religion, Politics and Other Polarizing Topics.” But, it’s not just a matter of company leaders telling employees, “OK. Let’s talk.” Rather, the skills needed to be more intentional about approaching these conversations have to first be developed.

And that’s where the 10th Annual Inclusion Conference, being held from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Aug. 23 at LaCentre Conference & Banquet Facility in Westlake, comes in. During this full-day experience, Mary-Frances, along with Winters Group Vice President of Innovation & Learning Brittany J. Harris, will lead an open forum discussion and training on what skills are needed to engage in these Big, Bold Conversations®.

This educational experience will give company leaders the background and tools they need to be ready to have these difficult conversations, evolve these talks into a priority and install a feeling of cultural confidence in their offices.

The Business Case
In addition to other benefits, there is a business case to be made for being empowered to act on trust, empathy and inclusive listening when having these Big, Bold Conversations®. For example, modules taking place during the conference will give diversity and inclusion practitioners, senior HR managers, supplier diversity managers, procurement managers and others the ability to:

·        have a better cultural understanding of themselves and others;

·        be equipped to handle various conflict styles;

·        build trust and empathy;

·        understand what trust means across cultures.

·        assess individual and team readiness;

·        prepare for conversations;

·        sharpen inclusive habits; and

·        apply the model for Big, Bold Conversations®.

 When taken together, the above represent an opportunity for employees to feel psychologically safe at work rather than helpless and overwhelmed when faced with these discussions that might otherwise be viewed as negatives. And studies have shown that employees who feel psychologically safe are more apt to take risks, feel empowered to speak up and, perhaps most importantly, bring a level of innovation to their jobs.

Is your organization ready to benefit from having Big, Bold Conversations®? Register today for the 10th Annual Inclusion Conference on Aug. 23. And click here to view the highlights from the Ninth Annual Inclusion Conference.

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