Do You Have "Advantage Blindness"?

Do You Have "Advantage Blindness"?

DANIEL GRIZELJ/GETTY IMAGES

No one wants to think they got to the top through an unfair advantage. You want to feel that you’ve earned it — that your hard work and carefully honed skills have paid off.

But the evidence on diversity in the workplace is conclusive: There are lots of people held back by bias. And that means that some of the people at the top have advanced partly through privilege.

Our research finds the idea of being advantaged to be uncomfortable for many senior leaders. We interviewed David, a senior executive who recognizes both having benefited from unfair advantages and the injustice of bias. He’s tall, middle-aged, well-educated, heterosexual, able-bodied, white, and male — and these provide David with unearned advantages that he intellectually knows he has, but that in practice he barely notices. He tells us he feels an underlying sense of guilt. He wants to feel that his successes in life are down to his abilities and hard work, not unfair advantage. “I feel like a child who discovers that people have been letting him win a game all along,” he says. “How can I feel good about myself succeeding if the game was never fair?”

Read the Full Article at Harvard Business Review

Diversity And Inclusion Matters To The Workforce Of The Future

Diversity And Inclusion Matters To The Workforce Of The Future

Diversity Doesn’t Stick Without Inclusion

Diversity Doesn’t Stick Without Inclusion