10 Steps to Successful Advocacy in Supplier Diversity

10 Steps to Successful Advocacy in Supplier Diversity

What’s so wrong with being fair? What’s so wrong with being equal? Why is it that some people have everything they need to be successful in business, while others are still striving for access to opportunities so that they can have the same success? Have we considered being equitable instead of equal? When we begin to unpack the notion of equality versus equity, we reveal the true meaning of inclusion, as well as the understanding that some may need more advocacy than others, so that both have access to opportunities, contracts, and the ability to succeed.

Equality, or being equal, is about sameness. It is the act of everyone being provided the exact same amount of whatever is needed, even if some need more and others need less. On the other hand, equity, or being equitable, is about what’s fair; it’s about giving what is needed based in whole or in part on historical barriers, roadblocks, or even current trends and conditions and providing what is needed to create that access.  

True support, intercession, leverage, and consideration rest on the shoulders of those who stand in the gap for others; this is the real value of supplier diversity professionals. Advocates for supplier diversity are in a unique position to function as liaisons to opportunities for minority- and women-owned suppliers, while serving a vital role to the supply chain and the organizations they serve. As supplier diversity professionals, we continuously juggle the demands of our role in the design, development, and implementation of initiatives to advance inclusion in our supply chain system-wide. Our customers are internal sourcing professionals, project managers, and executives, as well as external business owners, the communities we serve, and other stakeholders.

Click here to read this article in NAEP Journal

 

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